Home
Destinations
About Elite Travel
Travel Agent Locator
News & Promotions
Brochure
Contact Us
Plan your trip
Overview
Before you go
Visa Requirements
Clothing Recommendation
Rent Cell Phone
Forward Luggage
Travel Insurance
Best Time to Go
Weather
World Facts
Suggested Reading
Destinations - Europe - Budapest & Prague - World Facts

HUNGARY

Hungary became a Christian kingdom in A.D. 1000 and for many centuries served as a bulwark against Ottoman Turkish expansion in Europe. The kingdom eventually became part of the polyglot Austro-Hungarian Empire, which collapsed during World War I. The country fell under Communist rule following World War II. In 1956, a revolt and an announced withdrawal from the Warsaw Pact were met with a massive military intervention by Moscow. Under the leadership of Janos KADAR in 1968, Hungary began liberalizing its economy, introducing so-called "Goulash Communism." Hungary held its first multiparty elections in 1990 and initiated a free market economy. It joined NATO in 1999 and the EU in 2004.

Geography

Area: total: 93,028 sq km
Climate: temperate; cold, cloudy, humid winters; warm summers
Terrain: mostly flat to rolling plains; hills and low mountains on the Slovakian border

People

Nationality: noun: Hungarian(s) adjective: Hungarian
Population (2009): 9,905,596 (July 2009 est.)
Ethnic groups: Hungarian 92.3%, Roma 1.9%, other or unknown 5.8% (2001 census)
Religions: Hungarian 92.3%, Roma 1.9%, other or unknown 5.8% (2001 census)
Languages: Hungarian 93.6%, other or unspecified 6.4% (2001 census)
Life Expectancy at Birth: total population: 73.44 years : male: 69.27 years, female: 77.87 years (2009 est.)
Languages: Hungarian 93.6%, other or unspecified 6.4% (2001 census)
 
Government

Legal Syster: based on the German-Austrian legal system; accepts compulsory ICJ jurisdiction with reservations
Capital Name: Budapest
 
Economy
 
GDP: $185.7 billion (2009 est.)
GDP real growth rate: -6.7% (2009 est.)

CZECH REPUBLIC

Following the First World War, the closely related Czechs and Slovaks of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire merged to form Czechoslovakia. During the interwar years, the new country's leaders were frequently preoccupied with meeting the demands of other ethnic minorities within the republic, most notably the Sudeten Germans and the Ruthenians (Ukrainians). After World War II, a truncated Czechoslovakia fell within the Soviet sphere of influence. In 1968, an invasion by Warsaw Pact troops ended the efforts of the country's leaders to liberalize Communist party rule and create "socialism with a human face." Anti-Soviet demonstrations the following year ushered in a period of harsh repression. With the collapse of Soviet authority in 1989, Czechoslovakia regained its freedom through a peaceful "Velvet Revolution." On 1 January 1993, the country underwent a "velvet divorce" into its two national components, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. The Czech Republic joined NATO in 1999 and the European Union in 2004.

Geography

Location: Central Europe, between Germany, Poland, Slovikia, and Austria
Area: total: 78,867 sq km
Climate: temperate; cool summers; cold, cloudy, humid winters
Terrain: Bohemia in the west consists of rolling plains, hills, and plateaus surrounded by low mountains; Moravia in the east consists of very hilly country

People

Population: 10,211,904 (July 2009 est.)
Nationality : noun: Czech(s) , adjective: Czech
Ethinic Groups: Czech 90.4%, Moravian 3.7%, Slovak 1.9%, other 4% (2001 census)
Religion: Roman Catholic 26.8%, Protestant 2.1%, other 3.3%, unspecified 8.8%, unaffiliated 59% (2001 census)
Language: Czech 94.9%, Slovak 2%, other 2.3%, unidentified 0.8% (2001 census)

Government

Conventional long form name: Czech Republic
Capital: Prague
Independence: 1 January 1993 (Czechoslovakia split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia); note - although 1 January is the day the Czech Republic came into being, the Czechs generally consider 28 October 1918, the day the former Czechoslovakia declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, as their independence day

Economy

The Czech Republic is one of the most stable and prosperous of the post-Communist states of Central and Eastern Europe. Maintaining an open investment climate has been a key element of the Czech Republic's transition from a communist, centrally planned economy to a functioning market economy. As a member of the European Union, with an advantageous location in the center of Europe, a relatively low cost structure, and a well-qualified labor force, the Czech Republic is an attractive destination for foreign investment. Prior to its EU accession in 2004, the Czech government harmonized its laws and regulations with those of the European Union. The small, open, export-driven Czech economy grew by over 6% annually from 2005-2007 and by 2.3% in 2008. The conservative Czech financial system has remained relatively healthy throughout 2009. Nevertheless, the real economy contracted by 4.1% in 2009, mainly due to a significant drop in external demand as the Czech Republic's main export markets fell into recession.

GDP: $256.6 billion (2009 est.)


*Source: Central Intelligence Agency

Home
Destinations
About Elite Travel
Travel Agent Locator
News & Promotions
Brochure
Contact Us
Terms and Conditions
2008 Isram World of Travel, Inc. Elite Travel Collection All rights reserved. 233 Park Avenue South New York, NY 10003 Tel: 888.477.2649 Email: info@elitetravelcollection.com